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Why We Fail

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http://www.farnamstreetblog.com/2013/11/why-we-fail/

From the site:

So here we are today, the start of the twenty-first century. We have more knowledge than ever. We put that knowledge into the hands of people who are the most highly trained, hardest working, and skilled people we can find. Doing so has created impressive outcomes. As a society, we’ve done some amazing things.

Yet despite this, avoidable failures are common and persistent. Organizations make poor mistakes even when knowledge exists that would lead them to make different decisions. People do the same. The know-how has somehow become unmanageable. Perhaps, the velocity and complexity of information has exceeded our individual ability to deal with it. We are becoming inept.

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Do You Know This Scientific Solution For Performing Well Under Pressure?

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http://www.dumblittleman.com/2013/11/do-you-know-this-scientific-solution.html#more

From the site:

Pressure gets the best of the common man because when he enters a high pressure situation, he reacts in a way he thinks is beneficial, but is actually harmful.

An amazing study on athletes was published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. It found that athletes performed noticeably better in high pressure situations when they made a fist with their left hand. (source)

George E. P. Box Remembered

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http://www.qualitydigest.com/inside/fda-compliance-column/george-e-p-box-remembered.html

From the site:

On March 28, 2013, the world lost a person whom many consider to be a major contributor to the world of industrial statistics: George E. P. Box. Relatively unknown outside the world of statistics, Box was certainly very well known by those who have studied or practiced industrial statistics.

Personal Best

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http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/10/03/111003fa_fact_gawande?printable=true&currentPage=all

From the site:

I’ve been a surgeon for eight years. For the past couple of them, my performance in the operating room has reached a plateau. I’d like to think it’s a good thing—I’ve arrived at my professional peak. But mainly it seems as if I’ve just stopped getting better.

The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Volume I

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http://www.feynmanlectures.info/docroot/I_toc.html

Why I don’t believe in science…and students shouldn’t either

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http://blogs.plos.org/scied/2013/09/02/why-i-dont-believe-in-science-and-students-shouldnt-either/

From the site:

Science is how we describe the natural world, and if you search the web for “what is science,” three words tend to come up more often than others: observation, experiment, and evidence. Observations and experiments may not be perfect, even at the limits of our technologies, and interpretations may be flawed, but it’s the evidence that supports, or doesn’t, an argument that is the most important.  And we choose to either accept it, or not.

CCing to CYA

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http://brandonaaskov.com/blog/postid-2

From the site:

As more "process" is put in place, more barriers tend to come with it. The easiest way to spot red tape in an organization is to simply look at the CC field of an email. If you see managers, VPs, product owners, etc. in the CC field of an email sent to you, it probably means someone is pointing the finger at you and trying to cover their own ass. Sometimes, those kinds of emails are necessary, typically when the recipient is unresponsive. But when this happens for the vast majority of emails flying around, it’s a good sign that you’re missing out on a better culture.