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The Rule of 3

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http://blog.belimitless.co/post/73416815446/the-rule-of-3

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The Baloney Detection Kit

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http://www.farnamstreetblog.com/2014/01/the-baloney-detection-kit/

From the site:

After reading 11 Rules for Critical Thinking, a thoughtful reader forwarded along this video of Michael Shermer the editor of Skeptic Magazine. Inspired by Carl Sagan’s idea that there is a lot of baloney out there, Shermer proposes a 10-point checklist to assess the believability of a claim and help us sift through the noise.

The Fourier Transform, explained in one sentence

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http://www.r-bloggers.com/the-fourier-transform-explained-in-one-sentence/

From the site:

The daunting formula involves imaginary numbers and complex summations, but Stuart’s idea is simple. Imagine an enormous speaker, mounted on a pole, playing a repeating sound. The speaker is so large, you can see the cone move back and forth with the sound. Mark a point on the cone, and now rotate the pole. Trace the point from an above-ground view, if the resulting squiggly curve is off-center, then there is frequency corresponding the pole’s rotational frequency is represented in the sound. This animated illustration (click to see it in action) illustrates the process:

11 Rules for Critical Thinking

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http://www.farnamstreetblog.com/2014/01/11-rules-for-critical-thinking/

From the site:

A fantastic list of 11 rules from some of history’s greatest minds. These are Prospero’s Precepts and they are found in AKA Shakespeare: A Scientific Approach to the Authorship Question:

    All beliefs in whatever realm are theories at some level. (Stephen Schneider)
    Do not condemn the judgment of another because it differs from your own. You may both be wrong. (Dandemis)
    Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. (Francis Bacon)
    Never fall in love with your hypothesis. (Peter Medawar)
    It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts. (Arthur Conan Doyle)
    A theory should not attempt to explain all the facts, because some of the facts are wrong. (Francis Crick)
    The thing that doesn’t fit is the thing that is most interesting. (Richard Feynman)
    To kill an error is as good a service as, and sometimes even better than, the establishing of a new truth or fact. (Charles Darwin)
    It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so. (Mark Twain)
    Ignorance is preferable to error; and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing, than he who believes what is wrong. (Thomas Jefferson)
    All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second, it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident. (Arthur Schopenhauer)

The Top Ten Worst Graphs

Author displays graphs and discusses how they could be better.

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http://www.biostat.wisc.edu/~kbroman/topten_worstgraphs/

Also this – how to display data badly!

http://www.biostat.wisc.edu/~kbroman/presentations/IowaState2013/graphs_combined.pdf

11 Simple Rules For Getting Along With Others

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http://www.farnamstreetblog.com/2013/09/dave-packards-11-simple-rules/

From the site:

Dave Packard’s 11 Simple Rules

    1. Think first of the other fellow. This is THE foundation — the first requisite — for getting along with others. And it is the one truly difficult accomplishment you must make. Gaining this, the rest will be “a breeze.”

    2. Build up the other person’s sense of importance. When we make the other person seem less important, we frustrate one of his deepest urges. Allow him to feel equality or superiority, and we can easily get along with him.

    3. Respect the other man’s personality rights. Respect as something sacred the other fellow’s right to be different from you. No two personalities are ever molded by precisely the same forces.

    4. Give sincere appreciation. If we think someone has done a thing well, we should never hesitate to let him know it. WARNING: This does not mean promiscuous use of obvious flattery. Flattery with most intelligent people gets exactly the reaction it deserves — contempt for the egotistical “phony” who stoops to it.

    5. Eliminate the negative. Criticism seldom does what its user intends, for it invariably causes resentment. The tiniest bit of disapproval can sometimes cause a resentment which will rankle — to your disadvantage — for years.

    6. Avoid openly trying to reform people. Every man knows he is imperfect, but he doesn’t want someone else trying to correct his faults. If you want to improve a person, help him to embrace a higher working goal — a standard, an ideal — and he will do his own “making over” far more effectively than you can do it for him.

    7. Try to understand the other person. How would you react to similar circumstances? When you begin to see the “whys” of him you can’t help but get along better with him.

    8. Check first impressions. We are especially prone to dislike some people on first sight because of some vague resemblance (of which we are usually unaware) to someone else whom we have had reason to dislike. Follow Abraham Lincoln’s famous self-instruction: “I do not like that man; therefore I shall get to know him better.”

    9. Take care with the little details. Watch your smile, your tone of voice, how you use your eyes, the way you greet people, the use of nicknames and remembering faces, names and dates. Little things add polish to your skill in dealing with people. Constantly, deliberately think of them until they become a natural part of your personality.

    10. Develop genuine interest in people. You cannot successfully apply the foregoing suggestions unless you have a sincere desire to like, respect and be helpful to others. Conversely, you cannot build genuine interest in people until you have experienced the pleasure of working with them in an atmosphere characterized by mutual liking and respect.

    11. Keep it up. That’s all — just keep it up!

Deep Habits: The Importance of Planning Every Minute of Your Work Day

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http://calnewport.com/blog/2013/12/21/deep-habits-the-importance-of-planning-every-minute-of-your-work-day/

From the site:

The image above shows my plan for a random Wednesday earlier this month. My plan was captured on a single sheet of 24 pound paper in a Black n’ Red twin wire notebook. This page is divided into two columns. In the left column, I dedicated two lines to each hour of the day and then divided that time into blocks labeled with specific assignments. In the right column, I add explanatory notes for these blocks where needed.